Effective Narratives: Updating the GAMMMA+ model (EU RAN)

Authored by Alexander Ritzmann, Lieke Wouterse and Merle Verdegaal

The RAN Communication and Narratives working group (RAN C&N) has
promoted the GAMMMA+ model since December 2017 as a practical
guideline for carrying out effective alternative and counter narrative (AN
/CN) campaigns. Since then, the GAMMMA+ model has served
practitioners from all over the European Union as a tool when planning
and implementing communications campaigns. After two years and based
on feedback and insights from practitioners at the RAN C&N Academy in
November 2019, it is time to update the model in the format of this expost paper.

DGAP: EXTREMISMUS BEKÄMPFEN, DEMOKRATIE SCHÜTZEN – Prävention von gewaltbereitem Extremismus in der EU

DGAP POLICY BRIEF 28. November 2019
Sofia Koller und Alexander Ritzmann

Freiheitliche Demokratien sind fragil und von innen leicht angreifbar. Polarisierung, Radikalisierung und Terrorismus sind eng verwoben und die Digitalisierung gibt der politischen Gewalt eine weitere Dimension. Rückkehrer aus Syrien und dem Irak stellen eine neue Herausforderung dar. Wie groß die Sorge ist, Rückkehrer könnten in Europa Anschläge verüben, wird auch an der Diskussion über die IS-Anhänger deutscher Staatsbürgerschaft deutlich, die derzeit von der Türkei nach Deutschland abgeschoben werden.

EU RAN: Involving young people in counter and alternative narratives – why involve peers?

Radicalisation Awareness Network, Alexander Ritzmann

Summary
When working in multicultural teams, creating trusting
relationships is key. Policy-makers and civil society
organisations (CSOs) often share goals. But they might have
quite different procedures, approaches and perspectives,
and therefore ‘cultures’. Young people, an important part
of civil society, want and need to be empowered to become
more active members of communities preventing and
countering violent extremism (P/CVE). They can provide
perspectives, insights and a ‘spirit’ that most established
organisations will struggle to create without them.
This paper presents some of the key challenges and
opportunities identified at the policy and practice event on
cooperation between young people and policy-makers. It
also suggests concrete steps for building trusting
partnerships and effective multicultural teams.

FIGHTING HATE SPEECH AND TERRORIST PROPAGANDA ON SOCIAL MEDIA IN GERMANY: ‘LESSONS LEARNED’ AFTER ONE YEAR OF THE NETZDG LAW

Alexander Ritzmann, The Program on Extremism at George
Washington University
. This paper, part of the Legal Perspectives on Tech Series, was commissioned in
conjunction with the Congressional Counterterrorism Caucus.

Introduction
Over the course of 2015 and 2016, Germany had accepted around one million refugees, most from the Middle East. A right-wing anti-migrant backlash ensued, leading to a dramatic increase of crimes often committed by Germans who had no prior affiliation with extremist right-wing groups. On social media, hate speech proliferated, targeting both refugees and government officials who were deemed responsible for Germany’s open immigration policy. At the same time, the online propaganda and recruitment efforts of the so called “Islamic State” (IS) were at their peak and several IS-claimed terrorist attacks were committed within the European Union and Germany.

In 2016 and 2017, the German federal government initiated an investigation into online activities that violated Article 130 (incitement to hatred and Holocaust denial) and Article 86a (use of symbols from unconstitutional organizations) of the penal code, and violations against the Youth Protection Act. The organization mandated with the investigation reported 200 pieces of content per tested social media company (SMC).
Facebook removed 39%, YouTube 90% and Twitter 1%. Looking solely at content
removed within 24 hours of being flagged, the rates fell to 31% for Facebook, 82% for YouTube and 0% for Twitter.
Realizing that social media failed their own community standards and did not police their networks effectively in respect to illegal activities, Germany’s Network Enforcement Act, or NetzDG law, was introduced on May 16, 2017 and passed several weeks later. The short period for deliberation in the Bundestag was criticized heavily.
Federal elections were held in September that year so it appeared that for the governing coalition of the Christian Democrats (CDU) and Social Democrats (SPD), speed was more relevant than deliberation. The law was passed virtually unanimously among the CDU and SPD. The Free Democrats (FDP) and the party “The Left” voted against, the Greens abstained.

Studie zu Extremismusprävention (PVE) in der MENA-Region/Study on PVE in the MENA region

„GIZ cannot not work on PVE“ – so die Ansicht von Alexander Ritzmann, Autor der Studie „Prevention of Violent Extremism (PVE) – Methods, Approaches and Potential for GIZ Governance Interventions in the Middle East and North Africa” (link). Die Studie wurde vom GIZ-Fachverbund Governance in der MENA-Region (Go-MENA) in Auftrag gegeben. Der Fachverbund ging der Frage nach, welche Rolle die GIZ, und insbesondere ihre Governance-Programme, im Bereich Extremismusprävention spielen können, denn Terrorismus und gewaltsamer Extremismus bedrohen die Sicherheit und Stabilität vieler Partnerländer.

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